Archive for the 'Brands in Transition' Category

Schmidt steps down at Google-to refresh the brand?

Schmidt steps down at GoogleEric Schmidt has stepped down as Google CEO and Larry Page, Google’s founding CEO, is back in the saddle. Is this a move to help revitalize the Google brand? Steve Jobs gave Apple a big refresh; can Page do the same?

For years, Brand Channel readers named Google the Reader’s Choice global brand of the year. At times, Google has won more worldwide recognition than the likes of Apple, Starbuck’s, Nokia and Target. Why? Because “Google is kind enough to hide its high-tech interior from the public and give us nothing but a friendly, easy to use, clear, clean exterior,” said BC writers. In 2009, our Liquid Brand Impact Study, an annual study that identifies the technology brands that perform the best in terms of a brand’s impact on purchase behavior, named Google the top overall tech brand for the year.

From its start, Google has been clearly differentiated, known as a world innovator with one very clear mission: to revolutionize search, making it better, easier and faster than ever before. The company’s incredible success has meant fast growth, but does that growth and expansion into new products also contribute to Google’s brand dilution? And, when other search engines have copied Google’s search model and the Internet is moving from search to social interactions, can this still be considered the company’s main point of differentiation?

Who is Google today? Is it possible that this 24,000-strong global company is capable of being the same nimble, fast moving start-up it was eight years ago? Or, has Google grown so large that it’s at risk of becoming another Microsoft? These questions loom large over the Google brand today, even as it’s seen record earnings and is announcing the company will expand its worldwide employee base by more than 6,000 this year.

If Google’s move to bring back Page is, at least in part, a move to reconnect the brand to its roots, will it work? Apple aside, other tech companies that have tried to breathe life into their brands by bringing back their founders have been largely unsuccessful (Jerry Yang at Yahoo! and Michael Dell at Dell, for example).

Jobs didn’t just come back. He helped transform Apple into the brand it is today with innovative design and revolutionary products that were always on the horizon. He led Apple into its next evolution. A brand can’t rest on its laurels. We’ve seen the consequences of that. So, how will Google transform? We shall see what the future holds.

In the meantime, transformation is the theme of this year’s Liquid Brand Summit being held on March 1. We have limited seats left. Reserve now, and join one of the year’s most important conversations with influential thinkers and decision makers in the technology market.

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Making a brand relevant…again. The fine art of revitalization.

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The information/internet age has redefined the way we perceive, interact and evolve with large brands in “real time” - today’s hottest new thing, tomorrow’s cold coffee. Today’s brands face challenges everyday: The competitive landscape can become difficult to navigate; shifts in the corporate structure and/or ownership can be chaotic; audiences and their habits can change making it challenging to remain relevant; products and services can become obsolete or tarnished over time. Simply put, a brand now has to exist and thrive amidst continuously changing platforms and preferences. Established brands are capable of losing their vitality because of this transient landscape.

But, we have seen recent efforts from AOL, Yahoo and MySpace who have revamped their brands through successful experiential design campaigns. Even GM, has emerged from bankruptcy to become the biggest IPO in US history.

So…what are the tell-tale signs for a revitalization effort? How does one go about the task of reinvigorating a brand whose luster has faded? How do brands stay relevant with their audiences? What do you think the best practices for reinvigorating brands-at-risk. What are tactics for keeping a brand fresh, transforming relationships with consumers, and creating experiences that build relevance and loyalty?

Your thoughts and ideas are welcome.

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This is a session to check out

Earlier today I was talking to Laurie Probst, Symantec’s Sr. Director Global Enterprise Marketing Communications and one of our Brand Summit Session Leaders. If you are a marketer whose company is going through a merger or acquistion (and that means many of you) her session called: Brand Integration - What Happens When Brands Come Together - is one you will want to sign up for. Laurie’s will share with her group attendees some of her experiences working through the integration of brands, cultures, and working styles post the Symantec/Veritas merger. If you are someone whose been in a similar situation or might be, your contribution to this session will be valuable. See you there.

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HP should look for a new CMO at the Brand Summit!

In today’s SJ Mercury News I read an article announcing that HP’s CMO (Cathy Lyons) is now responsible for “strategic change management” for HP’s imaging and printing business…and HP is looking for a new CMO. Maybe HP’s recruiters should show up at the Liquid Brand Summit…where they can meet some of the sharpest brand/marketing minds in Silicon Valley.
:)
BTW: The article happens to also feature a quote from Rob Enderle…who was one of the panelists that helped judge the Brand Impact Awards!!! (Small world!)

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Brand Session Leader from Current TV is now at Yahoo!

We’re pleased to announce that Colin Decker is now at Yahoo!
When he signed up to lead a session at the Brand Summit he was working at Current TV, where he had the title of Creative Director, Brand Engagement. Now he’s at Yahoo! and his new title is Director of Strategy Yahoo! Video. In his new job he will be “providing product strategy and leadership to Video at Yahoo!”. CONGRATULATIONS, COLIN!!!! We’re excited for him..and especially excited that he will still be managing his Session at the Brand Summit, which is titled: Consumer Generated Content: Can Brands Let Go of Control?

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